Czerwiec 2014

OF INTEREST: "Very helpful for all of humanity"

​The clouds cleared up in time to welcome three distinguished members of the South Korea’s National Assembly on 25 June 2014. Hae Ja Park, Sye-kyun Chung, and Young Kyo Seo were accompanied by the head of the Korean Domestic Agency for ITER, Kijung Jung. They were warmly welcomed by ITER Director-General Motojima who presented the current status of the ITER Project before they headed out onto the construction site for a visit. At the end of the visit, Sye-kyun Chung remarked how impressive the project is and how, ‚in the long term, this project will be very helpful for all of humanity.’ Czytaj dalej...

OF INTEREST: Report urges Alberta to prepare for fusion energy

​Learning to harness fusion in a controlled way — recreating the sun on earth, as a clean source of energy — is the objective of national programs in Asia, Europe and the USA. And the race is heating up, with several quite promising options. According to Professor Allan Offenberger ‚A sustained fusion burn is no longer an academic dream but will be realized in the near future.’ Dr. Offenberger, on behalf of the Alberta Council of Technologies Society (ABCtech), led an assessment team on visits to the major programs around the world last year. As part of the assessment, the Society also entertained Alberta energy leaders in workshops in Calgary and Edmonton and invited international fusion researchers to report on progress at a Forum co-hosted with Alberta Energy at Alberta Innovates last fall. Included in the Report — and found favourable — was an assessment of the merit of employing fusion energy in oil sands extraction. ‚Fusion ignition generates heat that would reduce the need for vast quantities of natural gas in oil sands extraction,’ notes Dr. Robert Fedosejevs, from the Engineering Faculty at the University of Alberta, who also participated on the assessment team.   Read more on Troy Media website. Czytaj dalej...

OF INTEREST: Report urges Alberta to prepare for fusion energy

​Learning to harness fusion in a controlled way — recreating the sun on earth, as a clean source of energy — is the objective of national programs in Asia, Europe and the USA. And the race is heating up, with several quite promising options. According to Professor Allan Offenberger ‚A sustained fusion burn is no longer an academic dream but will be realized in the near future.’ Dr. Offenberger, on behalf of the Alberta Council of Technologies Society (ABCtech), led an assessment team on visits to the major programs around the world last year. As part of the assessment, the Society also entertained Alberta energy leaders in workshops in Calgary and Edmonton and invited international fusion researchers to report on progress at a Forum co-hosted with Alberta Energy at Alberta Innovates last fall. Included in the Report — and found favourable — was an assessment of the merit of employing fusion energy in oil sands extraction. ‚Fusion ignition generates heat that would reduce the need for vast quantities of natural gas in oil sands extraction,’ notes Dr. Robert Fedosejevs, from the Engineering Faculty at the University of Alberta, who also participated on the assessment team.   Read more on Troy Media website. Czytaj dalej...

OF INTEREST: V. Putin talks with Kurchatov’s director M. Kovalchuk

​Russia’s President Vladimir Putin met with Director of the National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute Mikhail Kovalchuk. Mr Kovalchuk briefed the President about the results of implementing a state program for developing the Kurchatov Institute.   PRESIDENT OF RUSSIA VLADIMIR PUTIN: Mr Kovalchuk, four years ago, you proposed a development program for the Kurchatov Institute. The Kurchatov Institute is one of the leading research institutions working in nuclear physics, if not the leading institution. And you have received six billion each year with the goal of development?   DIRECTOR OF THE NATIONAL RESEARCH CENTRE KURCHATOV INSTITUTE MIKHAIL KOVALCHUK: Yes, that was the amount.   VLADIMIR PUTIN: I know that the program is about to conclude, and I would like to hear about the results we have reached. Moreover, I know you are currently working on the next program.   MIKHAIL KOVALCHUK: Mr President, I would like to report to you about the most significant results reached while implementing the program launched on your initiative and the most important results that are significant for our nation’s economy.   Read the whole conversation transcription on the Foreign Affairs website. Czytaj dalej...

OF INTEREST: Operate a Tokamak from the comfort of your couch

​Ever been curious about how a Tokamak works? Or how it creates energy? Thanks to the new app Operation Tokamak from EFDA (available in IOS and Android), you can operate a Tokamak from the comfort of your own couch. Chose your level, slowly heat the plasma, and create energy—shooting all the while at magnetic islands in order to keep the plasma going. Though the app has been simplified from a working Tokamak, you can still get a good sense of the magnitiude of a real fusion reactor. And don’t forget to share your scores!  More information on EDFA website. Czytaj dalej...

OF INTEREST: Europe’s E-ELT blast marks first step in new science mega-project

​ Construction of the European Extremely Large Telescope has officially begun in the Atacama desert in Chile, marking the first step in a true mega-project that could offer us answers to some of the most profound questions in science.   The event this week, the blasting of the top of Cerro Armazones — 3,000 metres high until Thursday, a few less now — was far less dramatic than many of the onlookers at the European Southern Observatory’s Paranal facility 25 kilometres away had hoped for, but it was a significant first step in taking the E-ELT from the drawing board to reality.   The function of the blast was to loosen many thousands of tons of rock from the summit in order for the earth movers to begin clearing a flat, circular area for the foundations of the telescope. This really is just the first small step in a massively ambitious project to build the E-ELT that will take at least a decade to finish.   The science case for the E-ELT is quite easy to make, even to non-astronomers. While some of the great telescopes now in space and on the ground are designed to observe technical subjects such as the geometry of galaxies or the formation of stars, the E-ELT pitches itself as the telescope that will allow us to directly look at other planets around other stars.   The E-ELT science team reckon they have a good chance of being the first to directly observe little blue dots like Earth, if they exist.   Read more on Euronews website.   Czytaj dalej...

OF INTEREST: Soccer and JET: conflicting demands…

​The World Cup is an opportunity to take a look at how popular football games affect JET’s experimental schedule: JET’s peak power demand is over one percent of the UK supply — albeit for very short periods — so the supply from the grid is limited to 575 megawatts, and JET’s two flywheels are used to top up if necessary. But at some times, JET is not allowed to take any power from the grid at all. This happens when there are other major energy consuming events — such as halftime in a major football final, or in the ad-breaks in a popular TV show — times at which millions of people will switch on the kettle or go to the toilet, which creates an electrical load on the water pumping system. In fact JET power supply engineers are in regular contact with the grid, who advise every day the times at which pulses should be avoided — for example the fifteen to twenty minutes around sunset when lots of people turn on their lights. The engineers also monitor the frequency of the electricity supplied by the grid throughout the day: if the frequency falls much below the regulation 50 Hz they know the grid is under load and so they will recommend to the Engineer In Charge that pulses not be run. Read more on EFDA website. Czytaj dalej...

OF INTEREST: Nine years into one: the time-lapse video of Wendelstein 7-X assembly

In​ this three-minute time-lapse video, nine years of Wendelstein 7-X assembly (2005 to 2014) are condensed into three-minutes. The fusion device at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, in Germany, comprises five large and almost identical modules that were pre-installed and then assembled in a circle in the experimentation hall. Pump-down of the machine began in May. Read more about Wendelstein 7-X on the IPP website. Czytaj dalej...

OF INTEREST: Important progress for JT-60SA

​See the progress of the JT-60SA project — one of the three projects being developed under the Broader Approach Agreement — in this new clip filmed on-site in Naka, Japan. The clip shows that the six year assembly of JT-60SA is moving forward: the heart of the machine, the vacuum vessel, is now being built. Implemented by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the European Domestic Agency for ITER, F4E, the advanced superconducting JT-60SA (super advanced) tokamak will be used to quickly identify how to optimize plasma performance for ITER and will study advanced modes of plasma operation suitable for DEMO. A first plasma is foreseen for March 2019. You can watch the video here or read the news released on F4E’s Media Corner.   Czytaj dalej...

IMAGE: Pre-assembly operations will happen here

The Assembly Building—a vast antechamber to the Tokamak Complex—will house the specialized assembly tooling required for pre-assembly operations. The 6,000 m² basemat of the Assembly Building won’t be visible for long: construction begins this year on the walls of the facility, which will rise 60 metres above the platform. Czytaj dalej...

NEWSLINE: Roll them, turn them, bolt them: ITER assembly in high definition

The arrival of the first components on the ITER site will be the starter pistol for one of the most complex stage shows ever performed: the assembly of the ITER machine. In a first video back in 2011—The world’s largest puzzle—we explained the challenging task of assembling the cryostat. In a new video titled Roll them, turn them, bolt them, the job is taken one step further as we look at the installation of ITER’s in-vessel components such as the in-vessel coils, the blanket system and the divertor. None of these are easy tasks and a set of custom-made tools, platforms and cranes will be needed to transfer the bulky components from the Assembly Building, through port cells and into their final positions. The production of this eight-minute animation was certainly not as challenging as the assembly of the world’s largest fusion device, yet it was no small matter. Some 31,688 individual objects had to be managed per scene requiring the experienced hands of four graphic artists and animation specialists from the German-based company Motion-e-Motion. Their job was to sort out vast CATIA data sets describing the ITER machine, to reduce them, and then to ‚map, shade and rig’ (in video terms). Eight computers with powerful Intel i7 processors took on the job, sweating for 168 long hours to render the data into a high-definition movie. Czytaj dalej...

NEWSLINE: US ships 14,000 kilos of magnet hardware to Europe

One of the unique and unusual aspects of participating in the ITER Project is the long and often intricate journey that hardware components must make from their manufacturing and testing sites to Saint Paul-lez-Durance, France where ITER is under construction.   The logistics and coordination can be daunting, but the ITER Members are well prepared to face the challenge. The US Domestic Agency US ITER worked closely with vendor High Performance Magnetics in Tallahassee, Florida, to complete fabrication and transfer 800 metres of sample toroidal field magnet conductor to the port in Charleston, South Carolina, from where it will be shipped to the European winding facility in La Spezia, Italy. Delivery is expected to occur in late June.   The shipping procedures are exacting to ensure the safe delivery of the sample conductor, which weighs about 14,000 kilos—shipping crate included.   "The coil of sample conductor is about four metres in diameter. It is stacked up like a Slinky and can actually move like a Slinky if we don’t secure it," said Kevin Chan, a project engineer for the US ITER magnet systems.   The sample conductor, composed of non-superconducting copper strands, was produced in order to qualify the conductor fabrication processes; the production conductor installed in the ITER Tokamak will be composed of a mixture of copper and niobium-tin superconducting strands.   The lift fixture, which is integral to the crate around the conductor, helps the conductor maintain its shape within the ITER requirement of +/-6 millimetres. The US ITER team actually achieved an even tighter tolerance of +/-1.5 millimetres with the fixture design. The fixture also had to meet European standards for rigging and is CE marked to indicate that requirements w Czytaj dalej...