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LIPAc accelerator prototype installation begins in Japan

The IFMIF/EVEDA project is advancing. Concurrently with the accomplishment of the Intermediate Engineering Design report of IFMIF, the installation of LIPAC, the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator has now started in Rokkasho, Japan. The commissioning of LIPAc within the Broader Approach Agreement between Japan and EURATOM aims to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the IFMIF accelerator designed to operate two beams of deuterons at 125 mA with 100 percent duty cycle to obtain a source of fusion-relevant neutrons equivalent in energy and flux to those of a fusion power plant. IFMIF will be capable of providing >20 dpa/fpy (displacements per atom/full power year) with neutrons with a broad peak at 14 MeV allowing, within a few years of operation, the characterization of suitable materials for the first wall of the reactor vessel, together with the acquisition of data from fusion-relevant neutrons that will help material scientists unravel the underpinning physics. LIPAc is under design and construction mainly in different labs in Europe under the coordination of the European Domestic Agency (F4E), and will be installed in Japan by a joint team from Europe and Japan. On its own, with 1.125 MW of average beam power, LIPAc will lead the world ranks of high current accelerators. Its commissioning will be the responsibility of IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, led by Juan Knaster. After the successful performance during the individual system tests carried out at CEA (Saclay) in November 2012, the ion source and the low energy beam transfer have been delivered to Rokkasho and the installation activities have now started. An upgrade of the survey network in the accelerator hall was deemed necessary following a study by F4E to meet the alignment precision of 0.1 mm of certain components; an essential factor give Czytaj dalej...

Construction kick-off for Tokamak Complex

Early on Tuesday, 30 April the usual hustle and bustle on the fifth floor of the ITER Headquarters came to a short halt as ITER management gathered in front of a video camera to participate remotely in an event taking place at the European Domestic Agency, Fusion for Energy (F4E) in Barcelona. An event marking another milestone in the project’s history book: the kick-off meeting for Tender Batch 03, which is project code for the contract covering the construction of the Tokamak Complex plus another eight support buildings. The Tokamak Complex will be a seven-storey reinforced concrete building with a steel-frame crane hall and a total mass of around 335,000 tons. It comprises the Tokamak Building plus the adjacent Diagnostic and Tritium buildings.  All three are connected and supported by a common basemat. In addition to the Tokamak Complex, another eight buildings will be erected within the frame of the TB03 contract over the next 66 months, as well as 60 nuclear doors that will provide containment and radiation shielding during ITER operation and maintenance and three bridges. The scope of work comprises all civil works, heavy doors supply and implementation and finishing works. The preparation for Tender Batch 03 began with a competitive dialogue in July 2011 and concluded with the award of the contract to the VFR consortium on 20 December 2012. The VFR consortium brings together VINCI Construction Grands Projets, Razel-Bec, Dodin Campenon Bernard, Campenon Bernard Sud-Est, GTM Sud and Chantiers Modernes Sud as well as the Spanish company Ferrovial Agroman. „The start of this contract is one of the most important ITER milestones, as building construction is the main driving force of this project,” Director-General Osamu Motojima stated in his remarks following opening wor Czytaj dalej...

Progress on stage and behind the scenes

The ITER site has undergone significant transformation in the past year. Following the completion of the Seismic Isolation Pit for the Tokamak Complex in April 2012, attention was turned to site infrastructure works such as the deep drainage networks, critical networks, the creation of a platform Contractors Area (from where the different construction work packages will be managed), and finally the foundation for the Assembly Building. These projects are now in their final phases.   As the focus returns to the heart of the ITER platform—the Tokamak Pit, where concrete pouring will resume this year—we asked Laurent Schmieder, project manager of the division for site, buildings and power supplies at the European Domestic Agency Fusion for Energy (F4E), about the state-of-works on the platform and what we can expect to see in the months to come. K.D. A new phase of construction is about to begin. Can you describe what has been accomplished on the ITER platform since the last major milestone of Seismic Isolation Pit completion? A lot! In the last six months, our teams have focused on the construction of the Assembly Building foundation slab, an activity that required some excavation, much reinforcement and, since November, concreting work. The Assembly Building slab is about 95 percent complete and will be finished early June. Second, we oversaw the excavation for the deep rainfall drainage network and the installation of hundreds of metres of sizable (two-metre diameter) concrete pipes. These works caused major upheaval on the platform—currently, as we backfill and level, the mountains of dirt are slowly disappearing. Finally, we have erected Contractors Area 2 on the northwest corner of the platform. This area will host contractor workshops, a canteen to deliver 1,500 meals per day, and an infirmary Czytaj dalej...

IBF 2013: Galvanizing industry for ITER

One of the principal objectives of the ITER Business Forum is to promote industrial partnerships for ITER in Europe and abroad between primo-contractors to the project (Level 1), and potential subcontractors (Level 2 and beyond). The 2013 edition of IBF, held on 21-22 March in Toulon, attracted over 700 industry representatives from 24 countries.   Two weeks after the event, it’s interesting to step back and assess the Forum’s success. Were the companies that attended already known to the project? The statistics are now in. Of the 386 firms or organizations represented at IBF/13, a third (115) are Level 1 project contractors and another 97 have worked as subcontractors (Level 2, …). When questioned, over 80 percent of companies expressed their objective to become (or remain) primo- or sub-contractors for the project. We asked participants whether, in their view, the Forum was an efficient medium for companies to form business relationships and partnerships for the ITER project.  Pascale Dauguet, Scientific Market Manager and International Expert for Air Liquide Advanced Technologies (France): „The exchanges we had with members of the ITER Organization and the European Domestic Agency F4E were fruitful, and gave us a good idea of the current status of the project. IBF/13 also offered our purchasing and project responsible officers the opportunity to meet new potential suppliers. We will now analyze the capacities of these suppliers with a view to optimizing our outsourcing. The contacts we formed are potentially very valuable to us, for our work for ITER but also for other Air Liquide Advanced Technologies projects. Having all of these actors in one place for several days was very useful!” Kyung-Ho Park, Project Manager for Hyundai Heavy Industries C Czytaj dalej...

Civil engineering contract will change platform face

The ITER site is set to go through one of its biggest transformations, following the signature by the European Domestic Agency F4E of a contract for site infrastructure works with COMSA EMTE. Under this contract, for a value of EUR 35 million, a variety of civil engineering works such as lighting, drainage, special foundations, roads and trenches will be carried out. Eighty people will be deployed on the ITER site in order to ensure the coordination of the activities and reconfigure the 500,000 m² that will be directly affected by the works. The civil engineering works carried out through this contract will deliver to the ITER site a fully integrated drainage system (process discharges, precipitation drainage and sanitary drainage), outdoor and indoor lighting, a water management system, service trenches for networks between buildings, roads and parking areas, and special foundations to support equipment and site installations. A components cooling water network will be built to transfer heat from the systems for heat removal, operating side by side with the heat rejection system that will buffer heat loads during operation through an open loop system consisting of cooling towers, cold and hot basins, water pumps, valves, sensors and interconnected piping. Read the full story on the F4E website here. Czytaj dalej...

Crowning the cryostat from below

Columns are as old as civilization: for thousands of years, they have provided architects and engineers with a simple and sturdy solution to support heavy loads while leaving room to move around on the ground below. This traditional and reliable solution was to be implemented in ITER: a circular arrangement of 18 steel columns was to support the cryostat ring—the thick steel component that acts as a mechanical interface between the combined mass of the cryostat and Tokamak (25,000 tons) and the Tokamak Complex basemat. Columns do a great job supporting large, static loads. However under particular circumstances during ITER Tokamak operation, mechanical, magnetic, or thermal loads, singly or combined, could add up to generate considerable stress on the columns. In the case of a vertical displacement event, for instance, the Tokamak could „up-lift”; in the case of a cryostat ingress cooling event, the cryostat could „shrink”… Once refined, models and simulations showed that under certain conditions the load transfer to the basemat by way of the columns was not totally satisfying. For ITER Safety Security and Quality (SQS), this was clearly a potential safety issue. „As the Tokamak Complex basemat could not be modified, it was imperative to develop an alternate solution to the columns. In this, the expertise of Design Integration Section was fundamental,” explains head of the ITER Licensing Cell Joëlle Elbez-Uzan. Thus began, early in 2012, a ten-month collaborative effort involving ITER’s Safety, Quality & Security; Building and Site Infrastructure; Technical Integration; Cryostat; Assembly; Safety; and Magnet teams, as well as the European Domestic Agency F4E and their Architect Engineer, Engage. „The light eventually came from  Engage’ Czytaj dalej...

The "Unique ITER Team"

A "Unique Team" for a unique project. From left to right: Director of the Department for ITER Project Rem Haange; Head of Korean Domestic Agency Kijung Jung; Head of the F4E ITER Departement and ancting DA Head Jean-Marc Filhol; ITER Organization Director-General Osamu Motojima; Director of US ITER Project Office Ned Sauthoff; Unit Manager, Division of ITER Projet at JAEA Eisuke Tada; Deputy Director-General of ITER China Luo Delong; Head of Russian Domestic Agency Anatoly Krasnilikov and Ujjwal Baruah, Project Manager ITER India representing Head of ITER India Shishir P. Deshpande. Czytaj dalej...

ITER TV series resumes

Three years ago, in the spring of 2009, the local TV network Télé Locale Provence (TLP) and the ITER Organization entered into a partnership to produce a series of didactic and entertaining programs about the ITER project. Six programs were produced in all, each presenting a specific aspect of the project: science, the early works on the platform, safety, the „ITER people,” etc. The series resumes this Saturday with a program entitled ITER en chantier(s) / The ITER work site(s). Special guests Akko Maas, Laurent Patisson, Ben Slee (F4E), Ken Blackler, Eric Brault (F4E) and Fabrice Simon present the work that has been accomplished over the past year in both the Tokamak Pit and the Poloidal Field Coils Winding Facility. The program features the usual on-the-street interviews, this time in Vinon-sur-Verdon, where not everyone seems to be aware of what is happening just a few kilometres from their doorstep … This seventh program will begin airing this Saturday 8:00 am and 12:30 pm. It will be run on average twice daily for two weeks. (More details here.) TLP is accessible through the TNT Digital Terrestrial Network Channel 21, the FRANSAT satellite, and the Internet „boxes” Orange, SFR and Numéricable. ITER en chantier(s) can also be viewed on the ITER Organization Youtube channel. The six previous programs are available on the ITER web site video page (go to Video Categories and click on ITER on Local TV). Czytaj dalej...